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Scale Rail International No10?

 
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steve



Joined: 01 Nov 2006
Posts: 625
Location: North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 04, 2017 7:27 pm    Post subject: Scale Rail International No10? Reply with quote

Likely soon?

(Hopefully in a stronger envelope...)

steve
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Roger



Joined: 25 Jul 2011
Posts: 208
Location: Wales

PostPosted: Thu Jan 05, 2017 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very Happy Yay! Happy New Year!

(thanks for the replacement no9)

Roger
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Last edited by Roger on Mon Jan 09, 2017 10:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Roger



Joined: 25 Jul 2011
Posts: 208
Location: Wales

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No10 arrived today in tip top condition and what an edition!
Every article very interesting - a great read indeed
Thanks

Roger
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steve



Joined: 01 Nov 2006
Posts: 625
Location: North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No sign here yet Sad

steve
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Graham W



Joined: 15 Jul 2014
Posts: 25
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No sign of it here in London either.

Graham
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1968
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No 10 arrived safely with several goodies inside. I liked Tom Lloyd's Porth Garro harbour layout idea. How large (small, actually) would it be in OO, I wonder? Peter Bossom's thoughts on what might be suitable as rail traffic for a rural community was also interesting. I do not have enough local knowledge for his Sussex setting, but think that full barrels always travelled upright, while empties could be loaded on their sides.

Some other ideas from other parts of the country: -

The Wantage Tramway saw a daily van-load of ice blocks, packed in sawdust, which were shared by the town's traders in the days before electric refrigeration - grocers, dairymen, butchers and fishmongers would all need a daily supply. Another occasional load to be shared was salt (delivered from Union Salt in a peaked roof van), though this would be more occasional.

Peter asks what agricultural traffic might be appropriate in the pre-tractor area? Perhaps horse ploughs, harrows, seed drills might be appropriate, being delivered from the factory on a one-plank wagon. Would an general agricultural dealer get in an annual stock of hand tools (a van-load)? On the more exotic side, perhaps a mobile steam boiler coming from the factory - with chimney travelling beside it on a machinery wagon (a" locomobile" in French - what are they called in the UK?). Definitely a once-in-a-while load, but possible. Something like this


Other agricultural needs in pre-industrial fertilizer days, would include sand, lime or bone-meal for dressing the fields, probably delivered in sheeted open wagons, although there were also lime wagons with low-peaked roofs. Kent, and perhaps Sussex, saw traffic in hops, which I think travelled in long white sacks from the farms to the brewery.

A local flour mill might send out several van-loads a day if serving a nearby town that had a large bakery (Wantage, again). In the same vein, Lyons Cakes were delivered by the box-load in the 1950s (a picture of the Welshpool & Llanfair's brake van being loaded comes to mind) so this would be passenger traffic, but boxes might be visible, loaded on a platform trolley.

As country roads gradually became metalled in the 1920-30s (with the more general use of motor vehicles) would the contractors have had tar - in barrels - and chippings, delivered to a local goods yard?

I'm not sure of my dates, but the tall, tapering milk churns were, I think, only used pre WW1, after which dumpy churns were in use, but were soon replaced by bulk tankers - probably by the mid-1930s. Local dairies probably still used churns for customers with small bulk needs, but these would have been local, not rail, deliveries.
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Graham W



Joined: 15 Jul 2014
Posts: 25
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It popped through the letterbox here this morning. Another good mix of articles. I Like the article on 'budget modelling'...right up my street!

Graham
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steve



Joined: 01 Nov 2006
Posts: 625
Location: North Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mine arrived today too. And in a stronger envelope Wink

steve
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CRACKED



Joined: 12 Jun 2013
Posts: 130
Location: Lowestoft, Suffolk

PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Giles,

Locomobiles were simply called portable engines. Traction Engines were derived from these, which is surprising considering the Steam Tractors and Carriages of the 1820's. Originally portable engines were converted by the simpe expedient of a belt drive to the rear wheels, so they could haul the machinery with them - a horse was still required between the shaft for steering. This was followed by tiller steering using an extra fifth wheel at the front, then the centre pivot chain steering system.

There was an article on early steam power on the roads in an issue of "Model Trains" I believe
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Clive
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1968
Location: London

PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clive,

Many thanks for the explanation. Now you mention it, I do recall the article, but haven't read it since it appeared.
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