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Johns very varied workbench

 
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allegheny1600



Joined: 19 Jun 2010
Posts: 70
Location: Warrington, UK

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:11 pm    Post subject: Johns very varied workbench Reply with quote

Hi All,
As used to be the introduction to "Stingray" or some similar Gerry Anderson catoon, "Anything can happen in the next half hour"!
Well, anything can happen on here! What modelling I have managed to do is all too often for other people, as indeed is this 'piece' but for once, I managed to photograph the process.
My club (Leigh) has a rather nice colliery layout called "Bickersleigh", a contraction of Bickershaw and Leigh and one of my dear colleagues, Roy had been trying to make a curved turnout for the hidden sidings - out of old pieces of set track! To be fair to him, he had done a good job - given what he had to work with.
However, the starting point was simply not good enough (who on earth had suggested using set track?) so I decided to build a working turnout from scratch, using copperclad and rescued code 100 as it had to match the remainder of the layout. Due to the position of this point, it is critical to the operation of the layout. All this and there is just barely five weeks until our exhibition so I couldn't hang around.
I had no time to mess around with 'Templot' and I can't use it anyway so I simply made the measurements required by taking a 'rubbing' of the old point by pressing hard all over a sheet of A4 paper!
Once at home, I added some additional working onto this;


Really rough, eh?
I didn't even have any 4mm copperclad sleeper strip to hand so I used 7mm stuff instead. I actually thought it might be thicker and help match the original Peco code 100.


About an hours filing produced a reasonable crossing vee;

I stuck the sleepers to the paper with Pritstick and left them overnight then started soldering the vee into position;


I had quite a bit of trouble making and getting the wing rails for the vee set into position, I don't know what I did wrong there but carried on with then setting the switches into position, from where I could then calculate where the stock rails fit;

A couple of steps later and the point was more or less ready!


I used 'marigold' gloves while I scrubbed all the flux off (in the sink, with boiling water) and of course, safety glasses while I gapped the sleepers and it was ready to be taken to the club. I gave it a quick test by rolling a selection of wagons through beforehand and thankfully even that big gap at the vee, doesn't seem to be a problem (fingers crossed).
All I could get done at club was lift the old point and fit the new but it seems to work okay. Just have to motorise it and wire it now.

What do you think of my first point, please? I had a group tuition at the Manchester MRS where I got less than half a P4 point built and that didn't work and that's all I've ever done (apart from plain track). My only special track building tools were a code 100 roller gauge and the American RP25 'Standards Gage'
Cheers,
John.
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TTFN,
John E.

My other club's exhibition:
http://forum.mtimag.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2119
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You disappoint me John, there is nothing wrong with Setrack, assuming it is Peco. For a sharp curved point try to find one of the original Peco ones which were ist radius.

It is a good effort, but I prefer the easier option of r2r points. I could design an inset version for 3D printing easily.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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allegheny1600



Joined: 19 Jun 2010
Posts: 70
Location: Warrington, UK

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Simon,
The problem was that set track curved pieces were being used to try and form a point! It was just not robust enough!

On my "Bickersleigh" thread, you could catch a glimpse of the 'Managers office' that I have been slowly building over some time now.
I thought you might like to see how I went about my very first scratchbuild of a building. (many years ago, I built an N gauge 'iron ore' tippler wagon but that's a different story).

Oh jeepers! Looks like this all started some two years ago when my mate Darren presented me with a photo of the building concerned;


As you can see, I then made a simple sketch drawing of what it might look like in 4mm scale.

I bought a couple of packs of Alan Austin (Ambis Engineering) Midland Railway window etches and got busy snipping out parts and soldering them together to make suitable sized window frames.


This is shown on the first abandoned attempt at building in thick card, turned out too difficult to deal with.

My rough and ready soldering!


My second attempt used thin card, much better but rather flimsy, I had to bear in mind, this is Leigh model railway club with a few ham fisted folk as members!


After a scout around the club rooms and seeing how Steve, our chairman made buildings, I settled upon some thin perspex sheet I found. Tough stuff and of course, ready made glazing for the windows. My Olfa cutter (squawker) made relatively easy work of this material though so I soon ended up with this.


I turned these parts into a box


Some other thick plastic made a roof. I think this plastic actually came from an old tray or something, turned out a little soft but it still does the job.


Now to start on the walls.


I marked out the various window openings and cut out with a nice new scalpel blade.


The window sills were simply cut down plastic strip from 'Evergreen', happily the thickness of this was almost exactly one 'brick' thick so was easy to allow for.


The painted brass windows appeared to glue easily to the back of the wall, using EMA plastic weld - it's the only stuff that I found would glue the perspex.


Repeat this procedure several times for all the sides and ends and it's looking a lot more complete now;


Now to tackle the roof and maybe (given time) some details and weathering.
Cheers,
John.
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TTFN,
John E.

My other club's exhibition:
http://forum.mtimag.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2119
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John, I cut upa few Peco points, and been amazed just how strong they are.
Anyway, I assume that building was relatively new, so had luxury of cavity walls , otherwise would not have expected stretcher bond.
I could easily knock one up for 3D printing, but the window bars might not be as fine.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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allegheny1600



Joined: 19 Jun 2010
Posts: 70
Location: Warrington, UK

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Simon,
I'm guessing it was a relatively new building, say late fifties to early sixties?
Certainly much newer than the rest of the buildings on that site!
I'm now hoping that stretcher bond would be indeed appropriate? I'm sure it was approved for me to use when I started construction. As the son of a late former builder/engineer, I do hope so! (I hated bricklaying as a kid!).
Cheers,
John.

PS this is a one off but I'll bear it in mind about the 3D in future, thanks.
_________________
TTFN,
John E.

My other club's exhibition:
http://forum.mtimag.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2119
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I happened across some photos of part of the admin building for Huncoat Power Station, which I think was built in the 50s(confirmed started in 1950), and that was colonial/garden wall bond(every 6 rows is headers), but at a glance would be taken as stretcher bond.
Stretcher bond is common locally, but only for houses from start of 20th century. The North West was the first part of UK to introduce cavity walls, and thus stretcher bond, but commercial buildings would have no need for it. Not sure why, as one reason sugested for introducing stretcher bond was that it was quicker. Maybe in commercial buildings, the extra space taken up was a issue. All those square inches of air add up.

3D printing is not cheap, but you once designed it can be produced over and over again, and designs can be changed if required.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
allegheny1600



Joined: 19 Jun 2010
Posts: 70
Location: Warrington, UK

PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating!
Thanks Simon.
_________________
TTFN,
John E.

My other club's exhibition:
http://forum.mtimag.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2119
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