FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Just 'cos I like it
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Model Trains Interactive Forum Index -> The Bar
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I caught up with my French Schneider loco at a show recently. Its new owner has reworked it as a Portuguese engine, and very good it looks, too. Unluckily, I didn't have a camera with me to record its new look.

Meanwhile, on another theme, I collected the details of the loco shed at Le Crotoy (Baie de Somme line) a good while ago, when I was modelling French metre gauge. It's a great prototype and a good size for a model. The end of the shed seems to have been rebuilt at some stage as it is done in plain block-work.


A composite view of the side. Note the window shutters and the way the bricks have faded almost to the same shade as the mortar, or perhaps this is faded paintwork. The "half-timber" look probably places it in northern France, but it might possibly work as part of a German setting.


The front end, but note the immovable turntable with solid track supported by wooden beams (as I recall).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2017 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I was building Futtocks End I came across references to 15 inch gauge locomotives by the American firm of Cagney, but never found a good photograph.

An unexpected holiday bonus was the discovery of this example. It was much smaller than I'd imagined; no wonder it was found inadequate for freight haulage on an estate line. They were just lighting up, hence the smoke - a couple of minutes later there was a rather spectacular blow-back, with the whole cab in flames for a minute or so. Luckily the operator had stood back from the engine.

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This one's for Bob, but I thought I'd give it a general airing.

Built in 1904 by Turgan-Foy (who normally produced fairly conventional steam trams) it was used on the metre-gauge Dinard-St Briac Tramway. The rear overhang must have made a tail-load a bit of a problem, though possibly a light tramcar would have been OK.

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers Giles

For other readers, this is why the loco/luggage van was mentioned in conversation by PM.



Just noticed, this is my post No.1961 on MTI. 1961 was the year I received my first Tri-ang train set (a Jinty with a van, open wagon and brake) and I'm still playing with toy trains as I approach my 60th birthday!
_________________
Bob Hughes
Playing Trains

Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sometimes, nothing happens... For hours, or even days, on end.



But we still love railways just the same.
_________________
Bob Hughes
Playing Trains

Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just rediscovered a cache of pictures of Ste Emilie. They were taken at the layout's swan-song outing - at Expometrique in 2004, and I have now identified the photographer as my fellow operator, David Thomas. He has given permission for their use here, subject to retaining the copyright.

So many are shots that I always meant to take or else needed a better camera for. I'll start with an aerial view of the layout.


and then this panorama of the narrow gauge station with the standard gauge to the right and the town's market in the distance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2017 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to matters prototypical............

Here's a shot of Windsor & Eton Central a bit before I knew it in the 1950s - probably some time between the wars, at a guess. The signal bracket is of interest as it includes what I think is a backing signal for both platforms, both of which end at the buffer stops inside the station - so why were they needed?

My only insight comes from a the memory of arriving at the platform just in time to see the Pannier and autocoach start to leave for Slough. We flung ourselves on board and were taken to the far end of the platform, where the lcoco took on water, before returning to the inner end of the platform. A backing move, certainly - but needing signal control? Might it not qualify as a shunting move under the control of the Guard?

The only possible (and highly unlikely) way another train might get behind it would have been if there had been another engine in the adjacent platform, which could have moved over behing the autotrain by way of the scissors cross-over near the platform end; this was controlled by a local ground frame.

Anyone got any thoughts?

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

12 inch to the foot scale bodging.



Those reeds behind the platform and the small bushes along the lineside look artificial, very like model railway scenery. Note the close sleeper spacing, and short sleepers too. Code 100 flextrack? That could actually be On30 using HO track. See to how the sleepers are partially buried, a favourite trick of narrow gauge modellers when using the wrong scale of track.

The steep rock face rising abruptly from the level valley bottom looks like badly done scenery with a mountain plonked on top of a flat baseboard. And whoever built that shelter was a real bodger. It is a mess, as is the platform, in fact this looks like part of the FCPyF. Itís not, but it could be, it really should be!
_________________
Bob Hughes
Playing Trains

Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even the very short grass looks like flock powder Smile I like the station nameboard, too; a nice detail, easy to replicate. Does the last line read Trenes 2 Minutos? Surely not, otherwise it might be mistaken for a service describer like a bus stop!

Do we know in which country the shot was taken?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2017 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peru, I think it's the Huancayo line before it was converted to standard gauge.

I have no idea what the "train in two minutes" bit means. Certainly not the frequency though!
_________________
Bob Hughes
Playing Trains

Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I visited Expometrique in 2004 and was impressed with these figures, made completely from paper.

Something's going on.............


We'd better have a look.


This is what was inside - a recreation of the steam train demonstration in London in the early 1800s
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1985
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Time for another trip down memory lane, about 45 years, to when I was modelling in 00n3. The first shot shows part of the quay at Midhaven with the Pride o' Bristol pub. This was one of my first attempts at modelling a real building and was based on the Great Western Hotel from St. Helier, Jersey. The next two structures were by Bilteezi given extra detailing, while Perks & Perks was, I think, an Alex Bowie design, though the solicitor's' name came from a Giles cartoon of the period.


I always like the area around the level crossing in Bridge Street, Midhaven, although I never got around to replacing the Superquick shops that were only supposed to be "temporary".


At the far end of the layout, completed a couple of years later, was Lamberstock whose High Street included the old Ship (from Richmond, Surrey) and Fullers' tea-rooms (from Windsor). These were my first attempts using Slaters' styrene brickwork.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Model Trains Interactive Forum Index -> The Bar All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Page 6 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group