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Spares and repairs
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2018 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The man-rider has moved on a small amount and now has warning chevrons that are not perfect, but can be lived with - particularly after a bit of rust has been applied.


Meanwhile, I started on this small brake van some time ago, but the work stalled as I don't really have a need for it on Salop Street, which already has plenty of brake vans.


Then I found this, while browsing for something completely different.....

which at first I thought was a real restoration but on a closer look realised was a model. The thing is, how did two different modellers come up with what is basically the same idea. Did it actually exist? Does anyone know?
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over-enthusiastic buying of cheap wagons to rebuild for several projects has resulted in a collection of surplus early, crude, Jouef models including a "BR Tube open wagon". This one has become a tourist coach in On30, based on an idea by Bob Hughes on his FCPyF.



The widened body has had the drop-down doors replaced with cupboard-style doors, and the vehicle is mounted on a Jouef HO brake van chassis; the original underframe has been used elsewhere, under a spare cattle wagon body
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
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Location: London

PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This ancient and play-worn Tri-ang TPO came my way in an online auction job-lot a couple of years ago, and was one of my Penny Dreadfuls (as that was their unit price before adding postage costs). The mechanism is broken, side panels are missing, the couplings were altered to something that appeared home-made, and of course the wheels' back-to-backs are incompatible for modern trackwork.


Not a lot going for it, then!

It was always a train-set pleaser (and I was very happy with my working version around 1958/9), so I reckon could still be made useful as part of a modern "train-set". The main problems are the wheels and how to fit modern couplers.

It turns out on close examination that a former owner turned the bogies, to fit his couplings. The bogies themselves are plastic, (not Zamac, which I expected) so there is a good chance that one end of the bogie frames can be built up a little to support a modern tension-lock coupler. The wheels can be dealt with by removing a little of the face and then adding three or four washers between the two half-axles to provide an appropriate back-to back to suit Peco code 100 track. The rest of the work is then cosmetic. I think I have some GWR OCEAN MAILS transfers somewhere, so it could end up painted brown. It will always remain a "fun" item, but one which could still have some more useful life ahead of it.

I have a little time on Tuesday to take this one forward, and will try and report progress later.
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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2039
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

giles b wrote:



Not a lot going for it...


You could shorten the body and mount it on a three axle chassis or even further curtail it as a four wheeled mail/baggage car on a brake van chassis.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never thought about that option, Bob. There was a chance to pick up some 6-wheeled vans last Saturday, but as I hadn't a need, I let it pass. Anyway having taken about an hour and a half to re-gauge the bogies yesterday, I think it will stay an eight-wheeler. However, if mending the holes in the body doesn't turn out well I have a long four-wheel chassis going spare, which gives a good fall-back position. Thanks for the suggestion.

I should be able to start the body repairs and alterations (removal of the external mail-bag arms) before seeing what I can do about the blue paint. I'll almost certainly have to buy some GWR brown, but at least it will also come in handy for Goosewithiel, once that gets going.

I did pick up a couple of little projects on Saturday - a broken Hornby NE goods brake and an Airfix BR brake, coming apart at the seams; a bargain at 50p the pair! I've already fixed the Hornby one, so details as soon as I can take a picture.
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alastairq



Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 369
Location: the land that time forgot

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Giles! Smile

Regarding ye olde Tri-ang boogies?

I seem to recall you've tried re-wheeling before, using Milliput in the axle boxes, nad top hat [or bare headed?] brass bearings for pinpoints shoved in?

A bit fiddly, I know [best if a dab of milliput is inserted, then the bushes and wheelsets of choice...& a final bit of milliput stuffed into the open axle box ends...squeezed between fingers [not too tight] to centralise axles...then left to set?

I've not tried it with the plastic trucks..but found ye olde pedestal trucks to be amenable...especially with open spoked wheelsets. [these I am still going to make into either [a] narrow gauge logging bunks, or [b] Oo OO gauge heavy engineering tucks, similar vein, but for carrying long girders or beams in an engineering environment industrial, docks or something like?

I believe ye olde Mansell coach wheelsets can be found cheaply enough? [Ratio, perhaps?]
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2018 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did think of going that route, Alastair. However, the TPO's bogies are tiny and there's not enough plastic to allow for larger wheels to be fitted - and certainly not the 14mm diameter Mansell wheels, as the bogies are also rather tight to the original floor.

Given that the model's Rover "R" number is in the mid 20s, I suspect it is a contemporary of those early coaches that end up banana-shaped. Anyway, with a millimetre or so filed off the face of the wheels and four thin washers inserted between the two half-axles, it runs through Peco points now. It's really only a trainset piece, so I didn't want to spend too much time on it.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Sat Jun 02, 2018 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to bring the man-rider up to date



and one of the brake vans picked up a week ago, with an incorrect livery and minus roof, wheels and one buffer

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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The old Tri-ang mail van has been an ongoing job for some time. Now, finally, it's almost finished - just needing the transfers to be applied on the other side. Luckily these were in stock, as were the carriage numbers which I found by chance recently in my collection of partly-used transfer sheets.

Originally the model was from the days of the Tri-ang mk 2 coupling, although these had been removed by a previous owner, leaving little to which to attach anything new. I added strips of square styrene, pinned and glued to the outer faces of the bogies, which allowed a tension-lock coupling to be glued and screwed in place.

It's not an accurate vehicle, but I think it might be a useful coach on a train-set layout somewhere, one day.

Just what it is doing on an American riverside wharf is anyone's guess.

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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One or two new candidates for rebuilding. At a show last year I picked up a large job lot of odds, including the card bodies for two Peco Wonderful Wagons, an open P.O. quarry wagon and a Banana van. Needless to say, both were the wrong length to fit the Wonderful Wagon chassis in stock, waiting for a body. However, the Burgess Hill Club's second-hand stall last week-end supplied two underframes that fit, so these restorations can now go ahead.

Looking through my different boxes of bits also came up with a chopped up Triang open wagon and a short white-metal wagon underframe. The body needs some minimal adjustments and the whole will make a new P.O. Welsh colliery wagon for Salop Street. Possible names from the early 1860s would be Gurnos or Dulais, so I'll have to check my spare transfers to see if I can match either of these.
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