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Never seen this modelled

 
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Broadoak



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 1060
Location: Northamptonshire

PostPosted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 11:33 am    Post subject: Never seen this modelled Reply with quote

On some of the smaller ex GWR tender locomotives, 0-6-0 and 2-6-0’s especially if they worked in an area where rain was common, had a canvas sheet behind the cab. This made working tender first in the rain or very cold conditions slightly more pleasant than having no protection at all. The stout canvas sheet was attached to the underside of the cab and extended back and was attached to a metal frame at the front of the tender. It was only used on locomotives fitted with either the 3000 or 3500 gallon tenders. It was not needed on Halls Granges etc because they had a taller tender which offered more protection from the elements.

On the model the canvas sheet is represented by a piece of 2 ply paper handkerchief soaked in watered down PVA then painted a very light black. The creases were exaggerated to make it more noticeable and when dry was dry brushed with light grey colour.
I must admit I have a liking for small tender engines, not for me the Castles and Kings but a Churchward mogul or a Collet 0-6-0 every time.
















Peter M
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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2121
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have modelled a cab sheet rolled up, rather than folded back over the cab roof, on an On30 Bachmann mogul. A couple of smaller diesel locos have been given rolled up cab curtains too.

I like the idea of just folding the sheet back over the cab roof but, in reality, how much speed could be achieved before the slipstream started lifting it and eventually dropped it back between the loco and tender?

Nice touch as a rolled cab sheet tied in position under the rear of the roof, better still when drawn down over the front of the tender, but flipped over the cab roof? I'd be very sceptical about leaving it there when running chimney first at anything much above shunting speeds, even if it were tied down.
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Bob Hughes
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Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
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Broadoak



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 1060
Location: Northamptonshire

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob, thanks for your comments but before I modelled the sheet flat on the cab roof I checked with photographs. I have litererally hundreds of photos of small ex GWR locos with the sheet flat on the cab roof. In fact I haven't got one shown with it rolled up, I think it was held in position by the ropes that held it to the frame tied to the small handrails on the cab sides. Also at the sort of speeds these locos worked they weren't exactly tearing along.



This is typical of how the GWR had the sheets when not in use.

Regards Peter M
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Broadoak



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 1060
Location: Northamptonshire

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote








Bob a few more pictures showing the sheet flat on the roof.





Also the preserved example with it in the rolled up position under the cab roof as you modelled yours.


Peter M
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Broadoak



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 1060
Location: Northamptonshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have found another photograph which actually shows the canvas sheet flat on the cab roof tied to the handrail on the cab side. The locomotive shown is the last Bulldog in service, no 3454 “Skylark” photographed in 1951 a few weeks before she was withdrawn from service. Un-fortunately it is in a book, GW album no 2 by Dick Riley so I can’t show it on here.
I have noted that generally the sheets were fitted to locomotives in branch line or secondary line work, where the speeds were probably lower. Oddly enough though the photo of “Skylark“ was taken on the GW main line, so as in most things there are exceptions.


Peter M
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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2121
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Broadoak wrote:
... so as in most things there are exceptions.



Swindon in itself being such when compared to how the rest of the railways worked. Laughing
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Bob Hughes
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Broadoak



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 1060
Location: Northamptonshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is very true Bob, think of all those hydaraulic diesels they had for instance. How did they get away with that?

Regards Peter M
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