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1860 and all that
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Several tidy-up jobs got done yesterday. The goods office was finished off and stuck in place. The story is that the office was originally in part of the main structure, but as traffic grew they had to add a new, larger office, to gain some extra storage space inside.


Another shot of the goods shed also shows the railway policeman outside his new shelter. The engine shed has now been provided with a water crane, although I'm still wondering where to place the supply tank. For now, we must assume it is inside the roof of the loco shed.


The coal yard is taking shape on the front siding, but I must get down to closing the split in the corner of the back-scene. There may be a tree to distract attention from the right angled corner, though strictly speaking I suspect such a tree would have been removed during the construction of the station. The station building has gained a small canopy over the entrance door, which I should have painted before taking the picture.


Trees also feature in this shot - an experiment to see how to mask the fiddle yard exit. The last major structure, a timber yard, will go in the space to the left of the locomotive. The sheds will span the siding and should help to mask the hole.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2018 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just been reading the newest blog-posting about the FC Pampa & Fernandez, regarding Superquick paper tiles and slates. Looks like I'll need to do something similar on the engine shed roof at Salop Street. The maker has given this a corrugated iron finish, but has all the corrugations running the same way; OK on the ends but not on the longer roof faces. Surprised they didn't spot that when the masters were approved.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Layout is making its debut at the Wealden Railway Group's annual show on March 10th. Full details in the Events section of this website.

In all there should be 12-14 layouts, plus the group's second hand stall, scenic and modelling demonstrations and the Fenchurch 27 preservation group's display. This is a relatively small, but friendly show. The new venue has the advantage of having Lancing station a short walk away.
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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2039
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A slate roof would probably book better than wriggly tin on the loco shed. If you're after a smooth surface to hide any existing relief of the original roof a thin skim of filler does the job but is not always necessary. I retained the moulded relief on the station at Cuarto to emphasise the ridge tiles but the paper covers the original Tri-ang tiles adequately.



Pre-printed paper is all too often overlooked as a modelling material these days but it is so much easier to work with than styrene sheet.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that thought, Bob. I hadn't considered covering the corrugated surface with an undercoat of filler - more thinking of a layer of thin card/thick paper and then the slates or tiles, if I can get it to stick evenly.

Meanwhile, the new goods office would benefit from a line if clay ridge tiles on its slate roof. I have a carefully guarded few inches from a vintage Merco sheet. Kept since the mid-1960s, I suspect, so well past time to be used.

Today I'm making a start on the timber yard group of semi-open sheds, one of which will have a roof of (Ratio) curved corrugated iron. I did worry about whether this might be an anachronism in the 1860s, so looked up the history. Astonished to see the patent was taken out in 1829 and it was widely used from 1830 on warehouses in the London Docks, among other places.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite a bit of progress on the timber yard. The Ratio parts were used for the main view-blocking shed, which works well. This is an early view, the main structure has now been given a paint undercoat, before some internal detailing takes place and the roof goes on.


I found these half-used roof trusses in the spares box. They are left-overs from a structure built for Lazy River some years ago. Once trimmed they look a lot more useful, although I later removed the upright support beam as it was not long enough.


Later the second shed started to take shape and is seen here standing while the glue dries. I'll add more bracing before starting the wall cladding.
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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2039
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I made the buildings for Park Hall Halt I used the clear plastic glazing corrugated styrene instead of the solid wriggly tin because it is so much thinner. Not an issue with the body of the structure but the gauge of the sheets is very obvious on the roof of the waiting shelter and the canopy of the ticket office.


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Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also prefer to use the clear corrugated sheets (over card) for walls. For the timber yard I'm using a pre-curved sheet for the roof (Ratio kit part), while the other building will get a slate roof, probably ex-Bilteezi sheet - at least for now, for speed, as time is tight. The rear wall will be planked with balsa, the other three left semi-open.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Put the roofs on the timber yard sheds this afternoon, but need to paint the tin roof before getting the camera out. I've ordered some resin castings of timber stacks and similar to go inside, and also a water tank. This may go alongside the main line against the loco shed, or possible above the coaling stage; Timber support framework, either way.

Meanwhile having re-stocked on Kadees recently, I've started a campaign of mending couplers that have come apart, and putting them on wagons without couplings.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having finally laid the trackwork in the fiddle yard, train lengths on the layout could finally be assessed. Luckily they were just about as expected.

Some time was then spent yesterday evening thinking about the train sequence for Salop Street. There was already a timetable for the whole line, drawn up to work out the traffic passing through Great Sutton, so this was the starting point. As it had been drawn up for a portion of the line used by trains on the main and branch lines, by the time one gets out to the Bridgnorth end of the line, there were some rather large gaps, and the tendency for goods workings to be somewhat sparse - with the risk that operating the terminus could soon become boring.

However, by moving one or two of the earlier trains in the day, a pathway was found for a new mid-morning round trip to and from Salop Street. Now with two morning round trips, one leg of each could become a mixed train (should there be sufficient demand).

Another benefit of only seeing the trains that arrive in Bridgnorth, was the possibility of inventing extra virtual coaches for the branch trains, freeing up the modelled stock for the main line. The effect of this is that the same two passenger rakes serve throughout the day, with the occasional strengthening coach available for Market Days. This should make working the fiddle yards a lot quicker, as with Great Sutton a lot of time was wasted changing the make-up of passenger trains, where one mistake could have enormous consequences later in the day.

The basic timetable has been written out and the variations in goods traffic added. With Ludlow's Market Day falling on a Wednesday, and Bridgnorth's on Saturday there is a need for both empty and loaded cattle traffic on Tuesdays/Wednesdays, and on Fridays/Saturdays. The loco shed needs a wagon of loco coal on Monday, possibly topped up on Thursday, when salt for the town's traders is also delivered. Ice comes in daily on the early train with the empty van returned in the afternoon. All this keeps the goods clerk (and the shunter) busy - and that's before the town's general needs are serviced; both Ridley's Seeds and the timber yard should see some traffic, and so too will the Wulfrana Coal Co, who supply coal, lamp oil, and building materials. Goods and mixed trains will be busy, particularly as the gradients (in reality the run-round loops and fiddle yard) limit goods trains to 4-5 wagons plus a brake van. If one coach can be dropped from a passenger run, then two wagons can be added to form a mixed train.

In order to keep journey times down, mixed trains are only used for traffic running between the termini, the exception being cattle returning from market, whose wagons are added to the next available passenger train to be dropped off anywhere en-route. Luckily they alwys arrive at Bridgnorth with a maximum of two wagons, as this is all the station can provide unloading facilities for. Normally the intermediate stations are serviced by a daily goods train, which runs to Ludlow in the early morning, returning mid-afternoon.

I doubt there will be time to have a dry run, so the WRG's show at Lancing should be interesting.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Wed Feb 28, 2018 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A day of finishing off various projects - the fiddle yard now has track and screens around the front and end, a couple of cattle trucks have had their paintwork finished, while the unbraked one now has the normal lever and one wooden brake-block. On the population front, I have experimented with Ladies' fashions. Still quite crude, but she will be taking a stroll in the street beyond the station, so not too easily scrutinised.

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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Couldn't put it off any longer - the panel to layout wiring connections had to be tested. Also the high ballast, which had been tried out with a wagon, but not a selection of locomotives. Happily, it all seems to be working, although the original Hornby locos are far too speedy. Must remember to take the blue saddle tank and probably the Dapol Pug, off Shellsea, to act as stand-by engines.

Meanwhile, a lot of little finishing jobs to do - more foliage on the trees, grass round the base of buildings and some touch-ups to the stonework of the engine shed, which had been weathered with a vivid emerald green by a previous owner.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2018 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having turned the layout around, so that the controller could be plugged in for testing, I took the opportunity to get some shots of the layout from the non-public side.

The first one is a view of what's behind the railway fence in the town corner. The new member of Bridgnorth's population looks a bit lonely. I put some fellow citizens away safely a few weeks ago, and they're still on holiday; must send out a search party.


The area around the fiddle-yard exit has been developed recently. This is the operator's view. The public will see the train vanish behind the timber yard buildings, and they will never know what's lurking behind the loco shed.


Finally the "necessities". Enough said Embarassed Smile From the normal viewing angle the stone building on the right looks OK, but from this angle is a disaster!
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The missing figures turned up today, some already painted, others needing modification as well as paint. At least two potential station staff members will now be ordinary members of the public, with a change of hat style and more colourful clothing; then there's my second home-made crinoline figure to finish. I've also re-discovered a couple of men who are now taking a break from shovelling coal. In all about ten more figures, making a total of two dozen which I think will be enough for a small layout. This does not include the loco crews, who with open footplates are very visible.

I'm now moving on to layout presentation work having added a facia moulding along the front of the baseboard, as well as making a start on painting the layout's name on the lighting rig.

Who knows, I might even finish with a day or two in hand - rather different from this time last year, when the Great Sutton build went right down to the wire.
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giles b



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 2191
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was going to post some pictures of the new figures on the layout, but the sun was bright and the picture contrast too extreme. I did manage a shot of the two female figures I've been working on. I gave the second one a shawl and a bonnet, both of which have made her look rather tall. Still, people of differing heights do get married, so I shan't worry too much Smile


Meanwhile a reorganisation of my stock of miscellaneous spare bits and bobs has revealed enough Airfix and Slater cart parts to make a horse-drawn delivery wagon. Previously I'd wondered about using the horse as the station's shunting "tractor", but now he has a cart to pull.

First of all I'm tackling the need to build a salt wagon, similar to the one running on Shellsea Harbour.


I was thinking of using a part-finished open wagon, but the drop-down doors are wrong; salt wagons have cupboard-style doors. Instead I found another Hornby van body (the type carrying grocery slogans), and am in the process of cutting this down to make a peak-roofed shorty van.



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