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New terrraced houses on a hill

 
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2016 10:49 am    Post subject: New terrraced houses on a hill Reply with quote

Just got the N scale version of a row of stone terraced houses on a sloping road, with continuous roof following slope.


Might add some 'filler sections' under houses , but the way the attached road section goes depends on whether there is a 'garden' strip in front or not. Garden strips tend to be stepped.
Also plan to do version with shop at bottom of row, and this ma be version I get test printed. I have designed it so levels of shop match up as well.
This is N scale version, but bigger scales also can be done, but cost goes up . The N scale row above would cost about 25.

I have done it in stone finish, as this stands out better, and round here stone is more common. When brick started to be used ,post 1900, they seem to also have introduced cavity walls, so bond changed to stretcher bond.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

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Blackcloud Railways



Joined: 25 Oct 2006
Posts: 1984
Location: Sandbach UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say add the filler sections at ground level. It's easy enough to bury these if gardens are required but harder to create them if a sloped pavement is to be used.
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Once there were mountains on mountains and once there were sunbirds to soar with and once I could never be down.
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2016 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

here is version with shop and fillers

and front view


note front doors have steps.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

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Jordan



Joined: 27 Oct 2006
Posts: 1385

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The continuous, sloping roof seems to be very much a 'Northern' thing. There was much discussion about it elsewhere concerning the O scale layout "Heyside", which has a terrace like this.
Elsewhere, such as the Midlands where I live, the roof line would be horizontal and step down in line with the houses.
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

it is a northern thing, but also found in south Wales. Someone posted a photo on another thread showing a mixture , one row stepped, one row sloping.
Getting right building style(and materials used) for area you model is just as important as right livery on trains.
One reason I have started with stone effect is that it is more common than brick round here for houses, and brick seems to have started being used for terraced houses at same time as cavity walls and stretcher bonds, which was at start of 20th century.
For N scale, it is very difficult to actually distinguish brick bond(certainly on m 3D printed version), so I may cheat and use bond I have already designed, but for bigger scales I will probably design some stretcher bond components. For buildings in other parts of country, with stepped roofs, Flemish bond seems to be more common, so I will probably offer that as an option. One reason for now using components in CAD program.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

version of terraced houses with stepped roofs.

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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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Andy in Germany



Joined: 20 Aug 2007
Posts: 523
Location: Stuttgart

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've sometimes wondered why they didn't build accross the hills, following the contours. Wouldn't that be simpler to build? Or would the amount of hillside removal be more expensive than the different design?
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This area is pretty hilly, and edging onto Pennines. Industry tended to just spread out, and going up hill was quicker and cheaper than removing hillsides. A bit different now where warehouse box type structures tend to be built on flat easy to access ground.
Not sure why the sloping roof came about, as it is a more complex structure, but maybe some builders preferred it so that was what they built.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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Jordan



Joined: 27 Oct 2006
Posts: 1385

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also these houses were built in the days before mechanical diggers and so on. More or less literally built by hand. So earth-moving was a time-consuming & even dangerous work.
Round my way there are some terraces where some of the front doors are now 3ft above street level, as when they were built the street itself was just a gravel/dirt surface, & rose up in stages almost in line with the step of the terraces, so the doors were closer to the road surface. Once the street was levelled to a constant gradient for cars, some of the doors were left 'high & dry'. Usual access is up the entry to the back doors.
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CRACKED



Joined: 12 Jun 2013
Posts: 130
Location: Lowestoft, Suffolk

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sloping Roofs were a lot cheaper to build. Less brickwork and no flashing between the roof and wall of the adjacent house. The actual roof structure is basically the same as normal.
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ruedetropal



Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 814
Location: Accrington, Lancashire

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thought it might have something to do with rain.
These days with most of roof structure modularised probably easier to build non sloping. My old(1950s) ex council house steps every pair of houses. Presume that was easier than sloping roof.
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Simon Dawson
Will try anything once, looking for the ultimate easy to set up portable exhibition layout, preferably French narrow gauge and with lots going on, not necessary on the rails.

http://www.rue-d-etropal.com
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